DOOM (n.)(v.) - Do, Does, Done, Doom!

DOOM (n.)(v.) - Do, Does, Done, Doom!

And what word do we have today...

DOOM


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Doom

Noun
A terrible state of finality.

Verb
To condemn to a state of terrible finality.

History & Etymology:

The humble beginnings of the word ‘doom’ can be traced all the way back to the Proto-Indo-European dhe- meaning to set down, place, put, or do.

From the Proto-Indo-European there is a direct line through Proto-Germanic to many of the other Germanic Languages in a form much closer to the word we use today. For example Gothic doms, Old High German toum, and the Old Saxon, Old Frisian and Old English dom. These words all roughly ment judgment or decree.

Throughout dooms use in english it primarily meant judgment in a legal since. Law Books in Old English were even referred to as dombec. Though it was also used in the sense of personal judgment and opinion. Similar to the way deem is used today, in fact deem is even from the same root. For example in the council of Elrond in the Lord of the Rings Elrond say, “This is a doom we must deem.” Here he is using doom in its modern sense of “a terrible fate”, and deem in the more archaic sense of “to make a judgment”. Another interesting connection is dooms relationship to more common words like do, does, and done. All of these are variant forms of the early word dom.

The word doom took on it’s modern meaning in the 16th century from its usage in Biblical translations referring to judgment day or doomsday, when Christ returns and casts his final doom. This set firmly in the imagination of the masses the connection between doom, finality, fate, and hell.

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